Saturday, 14 September 2013

STAR TREK LEGEND GEORGE TAKEI ON SOCHI, HOLLYWOOD CLOSET AND WILLIAM SHATNER


George Takei starred as Captain Sulu in the original Star Trek TV series and six movies
Bugs' new interview with George Takei was first published in XTRA. This is the longer version of that interview.

Star Trek legend George Takei has been the ultimate outsider for much of his life. Interned in American “War Relocation Camps” during World War II, Takei later dealt with racism and the Hollywood closet during his Tinseltown years.

Takei is currently advocating for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics to be relocated to a country that respects gay civil rights.

George Takei
“I remember the terrible morning when [I was five-years-old in 1942] my parents got my younger brother and baby sister up early, and I saw two soldiers with bayonets on their rifles flashing in the sun, stomp up the porch and knock on the front door,” Takei, now 76, remembers. “They ordered us out of our home. My mother was the last to come out and she was carrying the baby in her right arm and held a huge duffle bag in  her left hand and tears were rolling down her cheeks. I remember that vividly.”

Takei's personal experiences in WWII internment camps would later inspire the 2012 play Allegiance in which Takei also starred.

“I remember the barbwire fences, but I also remember chasing butterflies,” Takei says. “A child is amazingly adaptable. It wasn’t until I became a teenager after the war, talking with my father, that I learnt how degrading and humiliating it really was for my parents.”

By the time Takei got to Hollywood in the 1950s, he was relegated to playing stereotypes. But Takei told his father, “I’m going to change that.” 

Saturday, 7 September 2013

XAVIER DOLAN KICKS ASS - AND KISSES IT - AT VENICE FILM FESTIVAL

(Xavier Dolan. Courtesy of Ixion Communications.)

Glory be! Proud Montrealer and 24-year-old film wunderkind Xavier Dolan finds himself once again rubbing elbows with filmmaking royalty at the Venice Film Festival where this week Dolan’s latest film Tom a la ferme was awarded the critics’ prize by the Federation internationale de la presse cinematographique.

A couple of years ago, at the Cannes Film Festival, Dolan was already a star and drank it all in.

"I was at Cannes for 10 days, did 160 interviews, drank too much alcohol and smoked too many cigarettes!" Xavier told me, laughing lightly. "[Then] I had this Cannes glamour moment where at some mini-shindig I walked into some bar with Benicio Del Toro and this French actress, and suddenly my life changed. These people were [no longer up] on the screen. They’re chatting with you and you’re talking to them about cinema and your life and their life and you’re laughing [together]!"

Wednesday, 4 September 2013

ROBERT PATTINSON REVEALS HE "PLEASURED" HIMSELF FOR REAL ON-CAMERA FOR GAY FILM




Robert Pattinson, shown here in the 2008 Spanish film Little Ashes

(Photo still courtesy Kaleidoscope Entertainment)

Before matinee idol Robert Pattinson won international fame as a vampire in Hollywood's Twilight franchise, he portrayed artist Salvador Dalí having a love affair with poet Federico García Lorca in the 2008 Spanish film Little Ashes.

Now, in a new interview in the September issue of Germany Interview magazine, Pattison admits he masturbated on the set during a sex scene.

“My orgasm face is recorded for eternity,” Pattison said, pointing out that faking it “just doesn’t work, so I pleasured myself in front of the camera.”

In other words, Pattison whacked off on film. This is what they call “method acting.”

Watch it here in GIF form:

Sunday, 1 September 2013

MORE! MORE! MORE! AUTHOR JAMES ARENA PAYS TRIBUTE TO FIRST LADIES OF DISCO


Bugs' interview with James Arena originally ran in Daily Xtra on Aug 31

Gay audiences had torrid love affairs with disco divas well before the mainstream even heard the first strains of Donna Summer’s crossover smash hit “Love to Love You Baby,” which peaked at number two on the US Billboard Hot 100 in 1975.

But according to James Arena, author of the just-published book First Ladies of Disco, the genre’s gay core fan base is very much a North American phenomenon, closely tied to that era’s gay liberation movement.

James Arena (Photo via Facebook)
“The women I interviewed in my book told me that gay audiences don’t dominate their shows in Europe,” says Arena. “Their audience base in Europe is broader and more diverse than it is here in North America.”

Which is also why – with the arrival of HIV – the homophobic “disco sucks” backlash destroyed many careers on this side of the pond. Disco, mainstream America made very clear, is cocksucker music.

But in First Ladies of Disco, all 32 singers that Arena interviewed – including Martha Wash, Anita Ward, Gloria Gaynor, Carol Douglas and Evelyn “Champagne” King – embrace their gay fans.